Top 10 mobile games

top 10 mobile games

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Side-scrolling 2D strategy game SteamWorld heist is a real treat. You control a team of robots invading and robbing a variety of rival spaceships, using each robot's abilities to get in and out and complete your objectives.

You have to take down foes and retrieve loot, taking turns to move and fire. It's stylishly executed, and makes use of excellent bullet physics to give you an edge over the robotic heavies you have to take down.

Renegade is one of those games that seems like it would be impossible on mobile, the graphics are just so jaw-droppingly gorgeous.

A jetski-style racing video, it sees you, a disgraced former champion, competing against other racers, performing stunts and defeating bosses for a chance to reclaim your former glory.

It's built on the developer's own engine, and plays like a dream, honestly. I'm a bit partial to machine sentience, so interactive fiction Komrad pretty much caught my immediate attention.

You, a human, have to gain the trust of AI Komrad at the behest of a mysterious person who delivers orders via text message.

Komrad doesn't know that the Cold War has ended, and doesn't know the professor who programmed it is long gone; but it contains vital secrets, and only you can unlock them.

Written by one of the programmers of IBM Watson, and playing out in real-time, it's an engrossing glimpse at what AI could one day become.

Rule With an Iron Fish is, sure, a fishing game, and it does pretty much what it says on the tin. But it does it with whimsy, panache, and a knack for progression that makes it an absolute delight to play.

You have to wander about your island base, taking quests from the islanders, usually to score a particular fish, all of which are cute and fun and allow you to upgrade everything.

It's tremendously rewarding, and you'll have a hard time putting it down. Smash Hit developer Mediocre has applied Smash Hit-esque gameplay to pinball, and the result is eminently playable.

You have to keep your pinball moving up an endless maze, collecting time as you go to give you enough to beat the tougher levels. It pits you, basically, against yourself, an eminently replayable battle to best your own times and perfect each stage of the maze, all in gorgeous neon and with Easter egg mini-games that you can play for precious extra seconds.

Replica has been called "Papers, Please" with mobile phones, but it's a little more complicated than that. You are being held in a cell.

You are given a mobile phone. You have to dig up every bit of dirt on the phone's owner that your captors ask for, or you'll never be allowed to go free.

It's creepy, discomfiting and entirely brilliant. Submerged is the fourth game from the Australia-based creator of Epoch, and it's a big departure from the studio's cover-based shooter.

It follows the adventures of a young teen girl, Miku, searching a deserted sunken city for the resources to help her wounded brother. While there are some puzzle elements, overall the game is a peaceful exploration experience that allows you to take your time and unravel Miku's story, and the story of the city.

The conceit is that you have found a phone -- and now you are being given social engineering tasks to perform.

It's not quite as deep a game as I would have liked I'd love an alternate reality-style game where you find a phone and have to solve a series of problems to explore it , but it was a peculiarly fascinating and emotional experience, and I was extremely sorry when it ended.

More like this, please. Solitairica is what you get if you mix Solitaire with a turn-based roguelike.

The gameplay is a little bit like Solitaire in that you have to create sequences of cards until there are none left, but you have to take down an opponent in the meantime.

Eliminating cards fills four meters, based on the card's type, and you can then use these points to deploy powers that you collect as you play.

These all disappear if you die, but you can unlock new decks and deck-based power-ups that give you a stronger advantage against your foes, each of which have different abilities you have to defeat.

It's really well thought out, beautiful to look at and fun to play. Fast-paced top-down rogue-lite shooter Leap of Fate borrows from action RPG Hand of Fate in that both games determine the level and monsters you'll be fighting with a random hand of cards, but Leap makes enough of a departure gameplay-wise that it's its own beastie.

You face hordes of foes, and the only way you can defeat them is by making use of your ability to step through the shadows -- a sort of teleportation skill that gives you an edge.

It's slick, stylish and contains a surprising amount of depth, combining that basic teleport ability with a range of skills.

If you played Botanicula and Machinarium , you already know what you're getting in for with Amanita Design's Samorost 3: A detailed, whimsical and utterly charming experience that will take some delightfully unexpected twists and turns.

In this point-and-click adventure puzzler, you take the role of a strange space gnome who uses a magic flute to travel from planet to planet to find its home world.

Arcade game Nightgate is an interesting mix of a game. You are tasked with flying around a network of intelligent computers called Nightgate, the last "lifeform" left on Earth in the year You have to activate nodes while dodging the computer's defense systems, then moving onto the next level, all in a strange geometric space.

It's mellow, but at the same time there's a sort of surreal tension to it -- a taste of what it might be like to go up against a vast machine mind.

It's pretty hard to improve on the Tetris formula, and when Lumines was released in it didn't necessarily do so, but it did offer a fresh take -- like a more complicated version of Dr.

Mario, without the viruses. It's still crazy fun to play, and a welcome reprieve from the frustratingly IAP-laden versions of Tetris for mobile.

If you're the kind who loves fiddly RPG details, Siralim 2 is your next great time-sink. It's a dungeon-crawler where you need to collect monsters to fight with you, combining RPG, procedural death labyrinth and roguelike elements into a literally neverending game with customisation, crafting and collecting right down to the finest detail.

Legend of the Skyfish seems heavily inspired by The Legend of Zelda, but with some awesome twists. It's not an adventure game, but a puzzle game -- and the only tool at your disposal to solve the levels and fight enemies is a fishing rod, with which you can jump from island to island like a hookshot.

Hiding behind a sweet facade is a game that will give you a run for your money. Pokemon Go has generated a lot of controversy, and yes, it's as buggy as all heck.

However, in just the first month, the map-based cute-monster-hunting game has seen over million downloads. Before now, augmented reality games using real-world data were few.

Love it or loathe it, it's possible Pokemon Go will change mobile gaming forever. If you've ever fancied yourself starship captain material, Quaser One is your chance, but not in the way you think.

It's a bit like Out There , in that permadeath-trying-to-survive-space-alone sort of way, but where Out There was about resource management, Quaser One is about performing critical ship repairs before something breaks.

You're woken from cryosleep because everything is going wrong, and the game becomes a frantic race against time. Hyperburner is a simple concept, but it's executed so beautifully.

You have to smoothly pilot your upgradeable ship through 30 levels of obstacles. Imagine trying to pilot a ship through a really tight asteroid field with no guns and limited shields.

The look and sound of the game is just superb, and the highly customisable control system makes playing the game a really lovely experience.

Double Fine is a big name today, and part of the reason for that success is because founder Tim Schafer made his name making games at LucasArts.

One of the very first games he worked on was point-and-click horror-comedy Day of the Tentacle, and it's become a cult icon for good reason.

Its release now on iOS is perfect. It's probably safe to say there's nothing that looks like what DrinkBox is doing, first with the brightly-coloured Guacamelee , now with Severed.

In it, you play a one-armed warrior named Sasha searching for her lost family in a land riddled with monsters. Severing and using their body parts allows you to get stronger.

Crypt of the Necrodancer is a dungeon crawler like no other. It's basically a procedural death labyrinth, but the gameplay is based on rhythm -- you have to move in time with the beat using your choice of control system taps or swipes , learning the monsters' rhythms to take them out without taking damage yourself.

It's an odd mash-up, but a brilliantly inspired one. It's sort of a one-touch endless runner, but you need to lasso yourself from animal to animal, finding new ones to fill up your zoo and completing quests to improve your zoo and get exclusive boss animals.

If you like 'em spooky and strange, point-and-click puzzler Bulb Boy is something you need to take a look at. It stars a little boy with a glowing light-bulb head trying to save his loved ones from the encroaching darkness and monsters therein.

With charming, hand-sketched art style, excellent audio, a great sense of humour and the gameplay itself, Guild of Dungeoneering is a winner.

For each dungeon, you choose your hero and then build your dungeon as you go, including monsters and treasure, by playing cards. Combat is also card-based, and as you explore more and unlock upgrades, you get stronger.

You'll need it, too: Once an adventurer is dead, they're not coming back. Imbroglio is Michael Brough's take on the RPG dungeon crawl, condensed into a four-by-four grid, with randomised wall elements, a variety of monsters and tools to fight them, and a levelling system.

Each play is self-contained, but the way you learn the game unfolds slowly, so that you become better as you figure out what everything on the board means.

A good meatspace party game is hard to find The setting for the game is a spacecraft, and one of the players is a shape-shifting alien bent on total annihilation.

The players have to figure out who the alien is before it's too late. Games don't really get much lovelier than Never Alone, a beautiful story about a girl and a fox, working together to solve platformer puzzles across levels inspired by Inupiaq stories.

Developer Upper One Games worked in collaboration with the Cook Inlet Tribal Council to create an interactive experience that's both emotionally compelling and educational, interweaving unlockable videos about indigenous Alaskan folklore and culture.

The game that lets you romance pigeons in a post-apocalyptic world that has literally gone to the birds has now come to mobile. It's routinely described as one of the oddest, silliest dating sims ever made , but it also comes with an oddly compelling story.

From the developer behind Little Inferno and set in the same world comes Human Resource Machine, a game that tasks you with using basic programming to conduct menial office tasks.

It's pretty easy to understand gameplay, but will really make you think about the best order in which to automate a task -- an awesome introduction to programming, a fun game for programming types, or just a standalone puzzle game for those who don't wish to take it further.

And, of course, there's a wonderfully sinister story that unfolds as the game progresses I don't know where the idea for War Tortoise came from, but frankly, this entire game is just wonderful.

It's a sort of tower defence-cum-clicker where you have to defend your stationary armoured tortoise why does a tortoise need armour? You do this with an array of upgradeable weaponry and troops, including snipers, air support and heavy units.

After a while you can automate the battle process, and the game becomes about upgrading your tortoise and units to dispatch the waves of critter enemies in the most efficient way possible, and moving on to the next generation of stronger, better tortoise.

Then it gets more difficult still, and you'll need to juggle both manual battling and unit management. It's a stylishly whimsical war game, and measures up to the gold standard we've come to expect of developer Foursaken.

This is the first game from two-person outfit Risky Lab, and it bodes extremely well for their future. Warbits is a sweet and funny turn-based strategy game cut from the same cloth as Advance Wars, but it's refined and updated it for a whole new generation.

The premise is that the game is a tool used by alien races to settle important disputes, rather than that whole nasty going to war thing, and the idea is to take out your foes and capture the most territory before your opponent does, using a variety of different units optimised for different tasks.

The entire game was built with the mobile experience in mind, so scenarios don't become long or drawn out; indeed, part of the challenge lies in maximising your efficiency to out-think your opponent.

And, in addition to its mission single-player campaign, it has a very robust online multiplayer, with various play modes, including free-for-all, 1-on-1 and 2-on And you can create your own custom battles if that doesn't float your boat.

It's extremely well thought-out and designed, and offers one of the best turn-based tactical experiences we've seen for mobile yet. It's pretty obvious right from the outset just how much care has gone into Goo Saga.

The side-scrolling platformer sees a tiny ball of bouncy goo escaping from a laboratory and setting off in search of its creator. There's something really delightfully tactile about the goo ball.

It makes squishy noises as it rolls, and you can inflate and deflate it to make it bouncier or squeeze it into tight spaces respectively. And the levels are genuinely challenging, too, with hidden traps and hazards, for all the game's approachable cuteness.

And there's a definite curve, too. You can complete levels in three degrees of difficulty in order to collect crystals, which allow you in turn to upgrade the goo's abilities, making later levels easier.

A platformer as well balanced and as polished as this is a joy. Zenge is a bit of an oddity. It's a puzzle game, and the puzzles become "pages" in the story of Eon, a traveller between worlds.

You have to piece it together, quite literally, by sliding the puzzle pieces into position, moving other pieces out of the way along tracks so they're not blocking your path.

It looks pretty straightforward, but it ramps up the complexity as you play. That said, it never leaves you feeling frustrated, either.

The game has no timers or move limits, which means you can take as much time as you need to solve a level, resulting in a really soothing experience.

Android iOS Windows Phone. This one is from the team who made the Quell puzzle games, and it's a variation on the theme of match-three.

You can only move a specific type of piece on the gameboard, and each level has a different challenge. So while you're on familiar territory with the basic match-three gameplay, it rapidly becomes challenging and strategic, rather than purely reactionary.

There's also an endless mode, so once you've finished going through the levels, you can challenge yourself to get better and better scores.

The first Train Conductor game dropped in late , and The Voxel Agents have grown a lot in that time. Take a look at some screenshots , then compare and contrast with the third and latest game in the series, Train Conductor World.

The original game saw you guiding trains along tracks to the correct egress across the screen, making sure they don't crash into one another.

That core gameplay hasn't changed, but it's undergone a pretty significant upgrade, introducing curved tracks, 3D graphics and build-your-own track configurations.

It's the best Train Conductor game yet. There have been some great board games released on mobile this year shout outs to Forbidden Desert and Tsuro , but quilting-themed two-player game Patchwork is outstanding.

The game combines two boards: The gameboard that players move around, and the blanket board, which determines how the players move.

Each takes turns stitching pieces into their blanket; each piece stitched will determine how many moves along the board the player can make. The pieces that can be used depend on how many buttons the player has, which is also dependent on careful stitching.

It's surprisingly deep and strategic. There's an excellent AI mode for single player games, and you can play both locally and online against a human opponent.

Indie puzzler Furdemption was pretty solid straight out of the gate, so sequel King Rabbit didn't need to change much at all. The gameplay is still excellent, moving around a top-down map as you try to figure out how to get to the goal without dying.

However, the new game has been tweaked slightly so that the difficulty curve is just a bit gentler, making it a much more balanced and user-friendly experience.

Interactive fiction is a medium that's really been stretching its wings in the digital space. Scott Leach's Able Black takes the story of an android taking a test to determine whether he will live or die, and mixes it up with brain-teasing puzzles.

Comparisons to Simogo's Device 6 are inevitable, but Leach's creation is a different sort of beastie. Where Device 6 challenged you to find the puzzles and answers in the text, Able Black is a bit more straightforward, and very different in tone.

It's as much about getting into Able's head and trying to figure out the best way to survive as it is about solving the actual puzzles.

It's a dark and lovely thing. Circa Infinity is going to drive you mad, by way of fun. You control a little pixel-person who has to hop an endless series of concentric circles, jumping from the outer circumference to the inner, and onto the next circle when it's close enough to jump onto.

It's very intuitive gameplay, which is good, because the gameplay very quickly ramps up to ludicrous, the circles filling with obstacles that you have to leap in order to reach the next circle.

However, it does really well at keeping the frustration at bay by simply knocking you back a circle when you get hit. You have to solve puzzles by manipulating configurations of coloured dots to fit "locks" on 3D prisms to open them up piece by piece.

It sounds simple, but it's complex enough to fire off those satisfaction centres in your brain when you manage to click a level together.

It's not a hugely long game, but everything about it, from the music to the multi-touch controls, is so beautifully polished that you'll definitely want to play it more than once.

Just as rymdkapsel was Swedish developer Grapefrukt's interpretation of real-time strategy, Twofold Inc is its interpretation of matching.

Like rymdkapsel, you really do have to play it to understand it although the trailer should give you an idea. Basically, you have to draw lines to join the blocks to make up numbers.

There's a sort of Threes-ish feel to it thanks to the exponentially increasing numbers, mixed with Grapefrukt's lovely minimalist style.

Super Phantom Cat also manages to raise itself high above the mobile side-scrolling platformer average, through sheer force of personality and general excellence.

Developer Veewo has managed to perfectly balance the gameplay, and the resulting game is so hard to put down. You're the little cat, exploring levels to collect stars and coins and make it to the exit.

There are enemies to jump on, power-ups to help you along the way, and secret areas to find and explore. What you're trying to do is become a superhero, and running around platform levels is apparently your key to success.

It's utterly charming, and about as perfect as a platformer can get. You control a motorsports vehicle speeding around corners by sliding your thumb on the screen, trying very hard not to crash, a skill that takes time and practise to master.

As you reach milestones, you can unlock new tracks and new cars. SMG spends a lot of time tweaking and testing their games to make sure the balance is just right, and it really shows.

Thumb Drift is a masterful execution of a simple concept, and an excellent way to while away bite-sized chunks of gaming time. Lost Portal is not your usual pick-up-and-play mobile game.

It is, however, a rich, deep, single-player card gaming experience, combined with dungeon-crawling RPG elements. Of all the games I tested for this month's round, Lost Portal is the one that sucked me in the most.

There's a lot to sink your teeth into here, with customisable character creation that makes for a lot of replayability, and a main campaign that will take you questing across a map, defeating foes and collecting new cards.

The game itself is premium, with no IAP for the time being , although the developer will be adding purchasable expansion packs in the future.

There isn't a tutorial, but there is manual that you can access in-game if you struggle to figure out how to play. You can also find more resources on the developer's website.

This is one of the coolest little arcade games we've seen. If you liked Downwell, Tomb of the Mask is going to be right up your alley as well.

You, the intrepid tomb You can also collect new masks that give you different abilities. It's frenzied, frenetic and gloriously retro, at its 8-bit best.

Point-and-click is one of the oldest gaming genres there is, but we rarely see one with as much panache as Glitch Games' A Short Tale. You play Jason, shrunk down to a tiny size, exploring the childhood bedroom of his missing younger brother, Ben.

It's so detailed, you'll get utterly lost looking for clues and then trying to figure out where to apply them, but the game is so beautifully crafted that it's a genuine pleasure to do so.

One of the great things about touchscreen devices is the touchscreen. But with Blackbox, you don't touch the screen at all.

Instead, it uses every other sensor the phone is equipped with: To solve the puzzles and trip the light switches, you need to first figure out what you need to actually do, whether it be travel, shout at your phone or tip it upside down.

It's utterly diabolical and utterly brilliant. Whereas Pumped BMX 2 also recommended went for a more relaxed take on hurling a BMX into the air with merry abandon, this sequel is all about mastery.

Implosion finds Earth having been given a beating by nasty aliens, leaving humans on the brink of extinction. As this is a video game, humans have pinned all their hopes on you and your natty battlesuit.

Fortunately, said suit can dish out serious damage. Occasional boss battles then shake things up in terms of pacing and challenge.

Between levels, you customize your suit, to unlock new combos. Even the complex controls for a touchscreen game work well.

A sticking point for some might be the price, but you can play six missions for nothing. In The Dog House is a sweet-natured puzzler featuring a ravenous pooch and a bizarre house with moving rooms, floors, and corridors.

The mechanics of the game are a classic sliding puzzler, with a few twists. The snag is any room the pooch is planted in cannot be moved.

Holedown is an arcade shooter that has you blast strings of balls at numbered blocks. When blocks are hit enough times, they blow up, allowing you to dig deeper.

Some blocks hold up others, and should be prioritized — as should grabbing gems that allow you to upgrade your kit more balls; new levels; a bigger gem bag when you run out of shots and return to the surface.

The mechanics are nothing new on Android — there are loads of similar ball bouncers. What is new is the sense of personality, polish and fun Holedown brings to this style of game.

This is a premium title and a labor of love. Osmos HD is a rare arcade game about patience and subtlety. Initially, it moves within microscopic goop, eating smaller motes, to expand and reign supreme.

And if you can convince a friend to join in, you can battle it out over Wi-Fi across six distinct arenas.

Motorsport Manager Mobile 3 is a racing management game without the boring bits. Rather than sitting you in front of a glorified spreadsheet, the game is a well-balanced mix of accessibility and depth, enabling you to delve into the nitty gritty of teams, sponsors, mechanics, and even livery.

One-off races give you a feel for things, but the real meat is starting from the bottom of the pile in the career mode, with the ultimate aim of becoming a winner.

Supertype is a word game more concerned with the shape of letters than the words they might create. Each hand-designed level finds you staring at a setup of lines, dots, and empty spaces in which to type.

Tap out some letters, press the tick mark, and everything starts to move. The aim is to get the letters you type to the dots. Typeshift rethinks word searches and crosswords.

You get a tactile interface of jumbled letters within draggable columns. The game occasionally heads further into traditional crossword territory, adding clues to the mix, which you must match to the words you find.

There are joyful animated and audio touches throughout, too, and everything feels hand-crafted, rather than you being sent endless algorithmically generated puzzles.

Naturally, such polish costs money — beyond the free download, you pay for packs of puzzles. You take on a friend or AI opponent, on a battlefield that can be squeezed on to a table or conceivably resized to fill a big chunk of a lawn.

So, yes, this one has a veneer of weird, but the underlying mechanics are straightforward enough: Get in some headshots, and the game rewards you.

The main downsides to the game are repetition and brevity. Dissembler is a match-three game with a difference.

You still swap two elements to try and match three or more , but here matches vanish. The idea is to end up with a blank canvas.

Old Sins finds you investigating the disappearance of an engineer and his wife. The trail leads you to a spooky attic.

On getting the lights working, you see a strange dollhouse, which then sucks you inside. You discover the toy is in fact a full reconstruction of a mansion, with a side order of Lovecraftian horror.

Unraveling the mystery at the heart of the game and its impossible world then happens by way of devious, complex, tactile logic puzzles. SiNKR is a puzzle game based around pucks, hooks and holes or, if you like, hooks, lines, and sinkers.

Pucks are dotted about, and you must drag them to holes by using hooks that are retracted by you pressing hexagonal buttons. The clever bit is how SiNKR works with such basic elements to create puzzles that have you staring at the screen, baffled as to the correct order in which to retract the hooks, and when to flip them over.

Still, this kind of premium ad-free experience is to be encouraged on Android, and SiNKR is easily worth the tiny outlay.

At the center of the screen is a five-by-five grid, which you tap to build blocky structures from cubes. The aim is to have the shadows they project match patterns on two visible walls.

At first, this is simple stuff, but. Super Hexagon is an endless survival game that mercilessly laughs at your incompetence. It begins with a tiny spaceship at the center of the screen, and walls rapidly closing in.

All you need to do is move left and right to nip through the gaps. It seems impossible, but you soon start to recognize patterns in the walls. String together some deft moves, survive a minute by the skin of your teeth, and you briefly feel like a boss as new arenas are unlocked.

And although complacency is wiped from your face the instant you venture near them, Super Hexagon has an intoxicating, compelling nature to offset its mile-long sadistic streak.

Florence is an interactive experience at the fringes of gaming — a short-form illustrated storybook peppered with game-like elements.

These are designed to help you empathize with the protagonist — the titular Florence — and move the story onward. RunGunJumpGun finds a nutcase blasting his way through corridors of extremely angry, heavily armed aliens, while he himself is only armed with a really big gun.

That might sound fine, until you realize the gun is also his means of staying aloft. This means to go higher, he must blast downward, temporarily becoming vulnerable to incoming fire.

If he shoots forward, he starts to plummet towards the hard, deadly ground. ATOMIK therefore becomes a manic, high-octane balancing act of finger gymnastics, with the potential to get killed very frequently.

On every death, the game rewinds the level so you can try again, and wallow in your failure to complete challenges that are a mere 20 seconds long without dying dozens of times first.

But when you crack one, you really do feel like a boss. The game encourages you to breathe everything in, take your time, and work at your own pace.

Unlike most adventures, which tend to be obsessed with inventories, Sworcery is mostly concerned with puzzles that are confined to one screen.

Solutions are frequently abstract, involving manipulating your environment or even time itself. You may free woodland spirits with musical prowess, or discover a solution requires playing at set points during the lunar calendar.

It might come across as a bit worthy at times, and there are some missteps, such as the awkward, ungainly combat, but Sworcery is evocative and expressive, and full of pay-offs that tend towards the magical, unless you happen to be dead inside.

Fortunately, this little UFO is made of stern stuff and has a massive claw to pick things up. Since Part Time UFO embraces the frustration of claw machines, it can infuriate — not least when you topple a structure as the clock ticks down.

You choose a hero, and then set out on a semi-randomized journey, which largely involves hacking your way through a horde of monsters.

Only instead of swiping a trusty sword, or moving about a turn-based grid, your actions, attacks and strategy all revolve around cards.

Each direction has its own outcome, which may involve smacking your foe in the face, or replenishing energy.

Over time, you build up your deck, gradually increasing your strength and skills — until the moment you overstretch and are horribly killed.

And with every game being unique, Meteorfall is an Android title that should keep you playing for months. As you enter each tiny single-screen dungeon, you make for the exit, knowing that every step you take depletes your life force.

Regeneration gems are dotted about, which means your route is typically along serpentine lines. Sonic Runners Adventure tries to pull the same trick as Super Mario Run, distilling the essence of a much-loved traditional console platform game into a one-thumb auto-runner.

Sonic Runners Adventure features carefully designed multi-level landscapes, each with its own rhythm. Atomic Adventure is an initially jovial take on the apocalypse.

The first — short — part of the game gives you one minute to dash around your house, picking up supplies and family members, and lobbing them into a shelter.

The arcade section could do with dialing down the nuttiness in the controls. It offers many unexpected events, and a bleak, darkly comic edge that contrasts nicely with the bumbling arcade section that comes before it.

Spin it through a flat edge and this object suddenly becomes a chest, within which is a telephone that — when appropriately manipulated — becomes several other items in quick succession.

The ultimate aim is discovery — to figure out how to access each of the objects within the game. There are also plentiful secrets to discover, such as a moon landing featuring tiny cartoon astronauts, and a suitcase into which you can hurl an endless succession of socks.

Hidden Folks is a hidden object game with a soul. The difference is that everything here has been made with love and care, from the hand-drawn interactive illustrations to the amusing oral sound effects.

On a larger Android phone or a tablet, this is a particularly relaxing, absorbing game to lose yourself in for a few hours. Her Majesty is the follow-up to the well-received Reigns , which was more or less a mash-up of kingdom management and Tinder.

Again, the sequel has you perform regal duties, swiping left and right to make decisions, responding to demands from your subjects.

Throughout, you must balance the church, army, people and treasury. Should any one become too powerful or angry, your reign is over.

Like its predecessor, this is a clever game with recurring themes, along with plots and achievements that weave their way through the ages.

Zenge is a sliding puzzle game whose early levels almost insult your intelligence, merely asking you to slide a few shapes into place.

All this plays out within a no-stress environment. Million Onion Hotel is a deceptively simple match game.

At first, it appears you merely hammer onions the second they appear on a five-by-five grid, aiming to make complete lines and boost your score.

But Million Onion Hotel is full of secrets, leaving you to figure out how its mysterious world works. This extends to game and backstory alike.

Then there are the cutscenes, which seem to involve a hotel, a wormhole into a distant galaxy, and quite a lot of cartoon sex and violence.

Framed 2 follows in the footsteps of Framed — a puzzle game based around rearranging panels of an animated comic book.

The story features a mysterious ship, smuggling, and quite a lot of sneaky spies. As you play a scene, something inevitably goes horribly wrong for the protagonist and you must swap frames around to make things play out differently.

Like the original, this is all wonderfully tactile, but the puzzles are better this time around, with more emphasis on reusing panels.

You play Majd, whose wife Nour is trying to reach Europe. She contacts you via a messaging app, and you respond with advice — which may have a very big impact.

Monument Valley 2 is the follow-up to landscape-bending puzzler Monument Valley. As in its predecessor, you fashion impossible pathways by manipulating Escher-like constructions in order to reach goals.

This is a gorgeous game. The minimalist architecture is dotted with optical illusions. Imagination abounds throughout, and the color palette dazzles, half making you wish you could print every level out as a massive poster to stick on the wall.

In short, this is a mobile experience to savor. Caterzillar feels a bit like Super Mario Galaxy rendered in 2D, starring a ravenous larva.

Each level comprises a number of floating structures, which you can leap between. These spin beneath your many legs, making for a decidedly disorienting play experience.

Much of the game is therefore about figuring out how to get around levels where down may, within seconds, turn out to be up.

And just when you get your bearings, the game will helpfully fire you halfway across the level in a cannon, or shoot vines into the air, creating mid-air loops.

The rest of the actual underlying game is all rather simple: Also, some levels require an awful lot of backtracking. Thimbleweed Park is an adventure that sends you back to the halcyon days of But also, this game recalls classic PC point-and-clicker Maniac Mansion, in everything from visual style to interface.

Now and again, it perhaps gets a bit too obtuse. One that features plumbers who are also paranormal investigators, dressed as pigeons.

We did say it was weird. Death Road to Canada is a zombie movie smashed into a classic retro game.

Little pixelated heroes dodder about a dystopian world, bashing zombies with whatever comes to hand, looting houses, and trying to not get eaten.

The road trip is staccato in nature. The game constantly tries to derail your rhythm and momentum. In Choose Your Own Adventure-style text bits, the wrong decision may find you savaged by a moose.

Love You To Bits is a visually dazzling and relentlessly inventive point-and-click puzzler. Which is a bit icky.

Through its many varied scenes, it plays fast and loose with pop culture references, challenging you to beat a 2D Monument Valley , sending up Star Wars, and at one point dumping you on a planet of apes.

Run-A-Whale is a sweet-natured endless runner. When you let go and he breaks the surface, he soars very briefly into the air, before returning to the water with a splash.

Instead, you get blank grids with words along two edges. You must use at least one letter from each edge to make new words of three or more letters.

Each selected letter blasts a line across the grid; where lines meet become solid areas filled with your word. The aim is to fill the grid.

On smaller levels, this is simple, but larger grids can be challenging — especially when you realize a massive word that on discovery made you feel like a genius leaves spaces that are impossible to fill.

Two for the price of one, then — and both games alone are worth the outlay. It comes across a bit like a mash-up of Mini Metro and Flight Control. When your road system gets jammed, your only option is to start from scratch and try something new.

Otherwise, Freeways is a blast. Card Crawl mixes solitaire and dungeon crawling, and does an awful lot with a four-by-two grid of cards.

In each round, an armor-clad ogre deals four cards, which may include monsters, weaponry, potions, and spells. To progress to the next draw, you must use three of the cards dealt to you.

For example, you might grab a sword, use that to kill a demonic crow, and then quaff a potion. Getting through the entire deck requires strategy more than luck.

Generously, the basic game is free; but we recommend buying the one-off IAP to unlock the full set of cards and game modes. Miracle Merchant has you mix potions for thirsty adventurers, fashioned from stacks of colored cards.

Each customer asks for a specific ingredient, and mentions another they like. Across 13 rounds, you must manage your deck to ensure everyone goes away happy.

Fail once and your game ends. Combinations prove vital for success: Linelight is a gorgeous, minimal puzzler that pits you against the rhythmic denizens of a network of lines levitating above a colored haze.

Your aim is simply to progress, inching your way along the network, triggering gates and switches, and collecting golden gems. Early puzzles are content to let you get to grips with the virtual stick one of the best on Android.

As you tap the left or right of the screen, he briefly flaps in that direction before gravity does its thing.

Fortunately, you can fight back. Smacking into a demon destroys it. Some demons spit out loot when they expire, enabling you to power-up your owl in its subsequent lives.

As its name suggests, there are no virtual D-pads to contend with. Instead, as the aliens menacingly descend towards your planet, you tap their general location to fling something destructive their way.

Your weapons need time to recharge, and specific armaments work well against certain foes. In a sense, it all plays out like a strategy-laced precision shooter on fast-forward, with you clocking incoming hostiles, quickly switching to the best weapon, and tapping or swiping to blow them away.

There are just 30 levels in all, but only the very best arcade veterans are likely to blaze through them at any speed — and even then, getting all the achievements is a tough ask.

Super Samurai Rampage is a manic swipe-based high-score chaser, featuring a samurai who has - for some reason - been provoked into a relentless rampage.

Said rampage is dependent on you swiping. Swipe left and you lunge in that direction, slicing your sword through the air. Swipe up and you majestically leap, whereupon you can repeatedly swipe every which way, fashioning a flurry of airborne destruction akin to the most outlandish of martial arts movies.

The basics are simple: Your blue pyramid must nudge colored pyramids onto matching triangular spaces. Even early levels can stump, until you hit upon the precise combination of moves required to achieve your goal.

First Strike is an oddball combination of territory-snagging board game Risk, and classic defense arcade title Missile Command.

You pick a nuclear power and set about building missiles, researching technologies, annexing adjacent states, and — when it comes to it — blowing the living daylights out of your enemies.

The high-tech interface balances speed and accessibility, although games tend to be surprisingly lengthy — and initially sedate, as you gradually increase your arsenal, and shore up your defenses.

Eventually, all hell breaks lose, including terrifying first strikes, where enemies lob their entire cache of missiles at an unlucky target.

The first two Riptide games had you zoom along undulating watery circuits surrounded by gleaming metal towers. Renegade offers another slice of splashy futuristic racing, but this time finds you immersed in the seedy underbelly of the sport.

Sensible racers get nothing. The career mode finds you earning cash, upgrading your ride, and probably ignoring the slightly tiresome story bits.

The racing, though, is superb — an exhilarating mix of old-school arcade thrills and modern mobile touchscreen smarts. Samorost 3 is a love letter to classic point-and-click adventure games.

You explore your surroundings, unearth objects, and then figure out where best to use them. The storyline is bonkers, involving a mad monk who used a massive mechanical hydra to smash up a load of planetoids.

You, as an ambitious space-obsessed gnome, must figure out how to set things right. Just two magical moments among many in one of the finest examples of adventuring on Android.

Mushroom 11 finds you exploring the decaying ruins of a devastated world. And you do so as a blob of green goo. Over time, you learn how this can urge the blob to move in certain ways, or how you can split it in two, so half can flick a switch, while the other half moves onward.

This probably sounds a bit weird — and it is. But Mushroom 11 is perfectly suited to the touchscreen.

There are moments of frustration — the odd difficulty wall. But with regular restart points, and countless ingenious obstacles and puzzles, Mushroom 11 is a strange creature you should immediately squeeze into whatever space exists on your Android device.

In the late s, Space Invaders invited you to blast rows of invaders. In the mids, Arkanoid revamped Breakout, having you use a bat-like spaceship to belt a ball at space bricks.

Now, Arkanoid vs Space Invaders mashes the two titles together — and, surprisingly, it works very nicely.

Now and again, Arkanoid is recalled more directly in a special attack that has you belt a ball around the place after firing it into action using a massive space bow.

Increasingly, though, the game is laced with strategy, since your real enemy is time. In platform adventure The Big Journey , fat cat Mr. Whiskers is on a mission.

The chef behind his favorite dumplings has disappeared, and so the brave feline sets out to find him.

The journey finds the chubby kitty rolling and leaping across — and through — all kinds of vibrant landscapes, packed with hills, tunnels, and enemies.

But The Big Journey very much has its own character, not least in the knowing humor peppered throughout what might otherwise have been a saccharine child-like storyline about a gluttonous cartoon cat.

You play as Ruth, a young woman living on a remote farm in a s Norwegian fjord. She makes dairy products, sold to a town several hours away.

Then, without warning, a massive gold spaceship descends, stealing her cows. To say much more would spoil things, but we can say that this old-school adventure is a very pleasant way to spend a few hours.

The puzzles are logical yet satisfying; the visuals are gorgeous; and the game amusingly provides all of its narrative in rhyme, which is pleasingly quaint and nicely different.

Hero of the hour Dennis finds himself unicycling naked in this gorgeous platform game best described as flat-out nuts.

In iCycle , you dodder left or right, leap over obstacles, and break your fall with a handy umbrella, all the while attempting to grab ice as surreal landscapes collapse and morph around you.

The puzzling is more variable. The quest to locate your kidnapped grandfather requires defeating numerous logic puzzles. Anyone who thought Nintendo would convert a standard handheld take on Mario to Android was always on a hiding to nothing.

Still, really smart level design wins the day, and completists will have fun replaying the world tour mode time and again to collect the many hard-to-reach coins.

But somehow Card Thief cleverly mashes up cards and sneaking about. The game takes place on a three-by-three grid of cards.

For each move, you plan a route to avoid getting duffed up by guards although pickpocketing them on the way past is fair game, obviously , loot a chest, and make for an exit.

Card Thief is not the easiest game to get into, with its lengthy tutorial and weird spin on cards. But this is a game with plenty of nuance and depth that becomes increasingly rewarding the more you play, gradually unlocking its secrets.

There are so many questions there not least: That game where you cast a shadow on the wall and attempt to make a vaguely recognizable rabbit?

The game looks gorgeous, with stunning lighting effects and objects that look genuinely real as they dangle in the air. Mostly though, this is a game about tactility and contemplation — it begs to be explored, and to make use of your digits in a way virtual D-pads could never hope to compete with.

Top 10 mobile games -

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games mobile top 10 -

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